Rachel Tirosh

Rachelt408's picture
_____
SF OPEN STUDIOS
WEEKEND 4: FORT MASON
NOV 2-3, NORTH
General's Residence at Fort Mason
1 Fort Mason Room #Dining Room
San Francisco, CA 94109
_____

My second act as an artist is proof of life beyond high-tech. A self-taught artist, I grew up in a family who believed in the do-it-yourself model. My father was always fixing things; taking things apart and putting them back together. My mother enjoyed a variety of crafty pursuits and did quite a bit of painting as well. Consequently, I drew inspiration from my exposure to raw materials that were readily available to build more craft projects and from things I see all around me.
My first career was in electrical engineering. I spent a significant amount of time learning and following specific rules to design electronic systems. High tech criteria for success involves strict adherence to the specifications. With art, this is not the case and I relish the freedom of no right or wrong way to create. Art simply invites the desire for free expression without boundaries. I’m playing with texture and colors to evoke feelings of balance, tranquility, peace of mind, and harmony through my art. My main focus is 3D mixed media, creating acrylic abstract paintings and polymer clay sculptures, both of which allow me the greatest expression of creativity. When I start working on a new project, I never know what the results will be. Designs are limited only by the imagination and whatever materials are available in my studio. My work is defined by its rich texture and the use of a simple color scheme. As an abstract non-representational mixed-media artist, I work with ordinary, everyday materials, such as but not limited to paper, cardboard, and spackle. One of my favorites is pouring water mixed with glue and pure pigments over the texture. The spontaneity of the water expresses motion and accentuates the texture on the canvas. The layering process only stops when the painting is pleasing to my eye. After all, the real interpretation of the paintings is not what the artist sees; it is in the eyes of the individual viewer.